Drink Filtered Coffee. It’s Good For Your Heart.

If you’re holding onto a steaming mug of coffee as you read this – we hope it’s filtered. And not without good reason.

Recent research published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, found strong and convincing evidence linking coffee brewing methods and the risk of heart attacks.

The study examined 500,000 coffee drinkers, between the ages of 20-79 over a period of 20 years, and here’s what it found brewing in their cup of coffee.

So, What’s In Your Brew?

Canva - Person Poured Liquid on Container With Paper on Top (1)

  • Unfiltered coffee contains substances that cause an increase in ‘bad cholesterol’, which increases the risk of heart attacks. (This also includes coffee made using a cafetière)
  • Using a filter removes these lipid-raising substances, reducing the risk of premature deaths from heart attacks, by 15% on average. 
  • A single cup of unfiltered coffee contains 30 times the concentration of this lipid-raising substance compared to a cup of filtered coffee.
  • Drinking filtered-coffee is better for you than having no coffee at all. 

So, if you’ve been brewing yours without a filter, it might be time to invest in a few of these life-savers. Think Coffee. Think Filtered-Coffee!

So, How Much Coffee Is Good For You?

Canva - Woman With Black Manicure Holding White and Grey Floral Ceramic Cup

Your coffee habit might be doing you more good than you realize.

In fact, if you’re having 1 to 4 cups of filtered coffee a day, you might be reducing your risk of death from cardiovascular diseases by 12%, if you’re a man and a whopping 20% if you are a woman.

So, all you coffee-lovers out there, go right ahead and enjoy your coffee with a clear conscience. Just make sure it’s filtered!

 

 

References:

  1. Aage Tverdal, Randi Selmer, Jacqueline M Cohen, Dag S Thelle. Coffee consumption and mortality from cardiovascular diseases and total mortality: Does the brewing method matter? European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, 2020; 204748732091444 DOI: 10.1177/2047487320914443